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Earthquake Index Insurance (EQII) -- English Version

Supported by the Global Index Insurance Facility (GIIF), the International Finance Corporation (IFC) has been working with PT Reasuransi MAIPARK (national reinsurer of all special risks) to design and retail an index insurance product that protects the lending portfolios of banks from liquidity crises in the aftermath of an earthquake. This is relevant particularly for microfinance institutions (MFIs) and rural banks to be able to continue lending to communities when funds are most needed. Bahasa Indonesia version is also available here . Klik di sini untuk v ersi Bahasa Indonesia.
A newly designed Global Index Insurance Facility's Country Profile for Indonesia is available for digital viewing . The document contains an overview of GIIF's project in Indonesia and partner, PT Reasuransi MAIPARK.
In a CGAP blog, Thea Anderson and Muhammad Syahrin write that building disaster resilience in Indonesia is critical, as the country is battered by earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes, flooding, and droughts on a regular basis. To this effect, MFIs serve as a critical and immediate vehicle to financing after disasters. Recognizing this ongoing cycle, Mercy Corps pioneered the Indonesia Liquidity Facility After Disaster (ILFAD), which has partnered with global reinsurer Swiss Re and the World Bank’s Global Index Insurance Facility (GIIF) to design portfolio-level insurance products in partnership...
Supported by the Global Index Insurance Facility (GIIF), the International Finance Corporation (IFC) has been working with PT Reasuransi MAIPARK (national reinsurer of all special risks) to design and retail an index insurance product that protects the lending portfolios of banks from liquidity crises in the aftermath of an earthquake. This is relevant particularly for microfinance institutions (MFIs) and rural banks to be able to continue lending to communities when funds are most needed. Product brochures in English and in Bahasa Indonesia are available.
This study explores the feasibility of weather index insurance (WII) in providing cost-effective ways for rural dwellers to manage risk and better cope with catastrophic events. The case study analyzed is drought coverage for maize production risk in Eastern Indonesia. Indonesia is considered one of the more vulnerable countries to hydro-meteorological risks in Asia. In some agricultural areas, harvest and production dip significantly during ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) events due to belownormal rainfall. Indonesian production is highly dependent upon rainfall. Only 17 percent of the...
Full Publication This pre-feasibility report was prepared for the Ford Foundation by Jason Hartell of GlobalAgRisk, Inc., Ntongi McFadyen of the Livelihoods Department of Save the Children, USA, and Jerry Skees of GlobalAgRisk, Inc., under Ford Grant No. 1100-0121 and IIEF Program No. FF-5H016. GlobalAgRisk is a policy-oriented firm with close ties to the University of Kentucky. Our work is supported by international donors who recognize the importance of markets in transferring natural disaster risk as a means for developing and enhancing access to financial service by the productive poor...
Index insurance is a relatively new but innovative approach to insurance provision that pays out benefits on the basis of a pre determined index (e.g. rainfall level) for loss of assets and investments, primarily working capital, resulting from weather and catastrophic events, without requiring the traditional services of insurance claims assessors. It also allows for the claims settlement processes to be quicker and more objective. Before the start of the insurance period, a statistical index is developed measuring deviations from the normal level of parameters such as rainfall, temperature...
Policymakers in Indonesia are considering how to ensure greater food security, boost incomes of farmers and rural communities, and expand agricultural production to meet rising food demand from an increasingly urban population. The Indonesia Chamber of Commerce and Industry, KADIN, is taking a leadership role in the national discussion on agricultural policy. Agricultural finance is a critical element in this discussion, and KADIN has requested USAID’s SEADI Project to prepare an analysis of the situation related to key commodity value chains, including rice, corn, and beef cattle, as well as a review of global trends in agricultural finance. This report responds to KADIN’s call for fresh analysis and recommendations on how to improve agricultural finance in Indonesia. In light of recent dramatic food price hikes, and before the convening of the PISAgro working group on agricultural finance, the report arrives at an important point in time.
The nature of does nothing in itself to stimulate the growing of agricultural crops but it can insure the non-growing of them (Geertz, 1963). The nongrowing and loss of crops due to biophysical and geophysical processes have been interpreted as risks and catastrophes that human being need to anticipate. This paper asks: what were the impacts of natural catastrophes on Indonesian agricultural crops during the last four decades? And what are the options available to mitigate future agriculture loss and safeguard food production in Indonesia? The quantitative analysis is based on two national datasets from Indonesia, namely the Disaster Loss data from Agricultural Statistics produced by the Ministry of Agriculture in 2009 and an online disaster database from the National Disaster Management Office updated in March 2012. This research concludes that Indonesia can achieve better food production by adopting multiloss mitigation scenarios. The chapter further highlights the impact of climate change on Indonesian agriculture, and existing policy instruments concerning disaster risk reduction in agricultural sectors. In addition, it makes policy recommendations for the Indonesian government and the international community regarding alternative solutions towards agricultural resilience.
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